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Posts on Jan 1970

Micro & nano(bio)technology for Diagnosis: Changes and Challenges

Pilar Marco, Scientific Director of NANBIOSIS U2 Custom Antibody Service (CAbS) participated as Keynote speakers at the Second European Biosensor Symposium (EBS2019) taking about “Micro & nano(bio)technology for Diagnosis: Changes and Challenges” at the 2nd European Biosensor Symposium 2019 that took place in Florence (Italy) Last February 18-21.

The EBS brougth toguether young scientists, experienced researchersand companies to push forward new approaches on biosensor and and their applications,

Pilar Marco spoke abaut the changes ocurred on the field of Diagnosis since the days of “house calls”, relying primarily on physical examination, to nowadays in which a wide portfolio of biochemical analytical tests is available, and pointed out the challenge to improve knowledge in microfluidics, lab-on-a-chip technologies, system integration, device automation, and signal readout, as well as simultaneously measure distinct sets of biomolecular features on a reproducible and reliable manner. Prof. Marco also gave some examples of technological alternatives to circumvent these limitations in the clinical diagnostic field.

Pictures by Rudolf Schneider https://bit.ly/2T0yYNi

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The European Union highlights the relevance of the JUMISC’s Cutting-Edge Infraestructures and Technology, recognized as ICTS.

Jesús Usón Minimally Invasive Surgery Center (JUMISC), from Cáceres, partnert of NANBIOSIS, has recently made headlines on the website of the European Commission as an innovative center for Biomedical and Health Research.

In the interview to his Director, Francisco Miguel Sanchez Margallo, he explained how European Funds allowed Infraestructures and Vanguard Technology for biomedical research at the CCMIJU, which have already been recognized, as part of NANBIOSIS, with CIBER-BBN and BIONAND, as “Singular Scientific and Technical Infrastructure” (ICTS).

Complete news at European Commision’s Website: https://ec.europa.eu/spain/news/investeu_caceres_es

https://ec.europa.eu/spain/news/investeu_caceres_es
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GLP Analytical Validation Study in Different Animal Species

Beatriz Moreno Lobato and Francisco Miguel Sánchez Margallo, Scientific Director and Coordinator of NANBIOSIS unit 19 Clinical tests lab at CCMIJU, have reclently published an study in the journal Thrombosis & Haemostasis: Research, with the aim to contribute with methodological results data to help the researcher to establish the validation of the analytical methods used within the research.

Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) is a quality system of management controls to ensure the uniformity, consistency, reliability, reproducibility, quality, and integrity of pre-clinical safety tests.

In the study, different hematological parameters (WBC, RBC, HB, HCT, MCV, MCH, MCHC, and PLT) were validated in pig, sheep, dog and rabbit, calculatting the repeatability and the intermediate precision . The obtained results were statistically analyzed; the mean, the standard deviation and the coefficient of variation were calculated.

The study results ensure the quality and integrity of the measurements obtained in the CCMIJU Clinical tests lab (unit 19 of NANBIOSIS), which is necessary in the performance of preclinical studies.

Article of reference: Moreno-Lobato B and Sánchez-Margallo FM. Analytical Validation Study of Hematological Parameters under Good Laboratory Practice Regulations in Different Laboratory Animal Species. Thromb Haemost Res. 2019; 3(1): 1018.

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PILAR MARCO, Scientific Director of NANBIOSIS U2, interviewed by CIBER-BBN ISCIII Bulletin

Pilar Marco, Scientific Director of NANBIOSIS U2 Custom Antibody Service (CAbS) has been highlighted in the January Bulletin of CIBER-BBN ISCIII

In the interview, among other topics Prof. Pilar Marco talks about diagnostic devices based on nanobiosensors and the extraordinary impact that these technologies could have on health in the coming decades.

Her research group Nb4D (Nanobiotechnology for Diagnosis) has an important collection of specific antibodies for different biomarkers and the CIBER-BNN/IQAC-CSIS platform CAbS (Custom Antibody Service) that constitutes the unit 2 of NANBIOSIS, they offer the possibility of producing specific and immunoreactive antibodies with the necessary expertise to generate antibodies “a la carte”, that is, being able to modulate to some extent the affinity and selectivity of these biomolecules, depending on the needs of each project. “And we do this, -Prof Marco explains- not only for molecules with high immunogenic capacity such as most proteins, but also for low molecular weight molecules, which in themselves are not capable of generating an immune response”. They are also able to chemically modify these antibodies and bind them to nanoparticles with defined optical, electrochemical or magnetic properties, thus converting them into nanoprobes able to detect biomarkers and generate an optical or electrochemical signal. We can also incorporate them in a controlled manner in transducer devices designed based on the latest advances in micro (nano) electronics to develop a new generation of diagnostic devices, much more sensitive and reliable, capable of providing quick answers and allowing a more accurate diagnosis early and accurate.

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NANBIOSIS Scientific Women in the International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Today February 11 is the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, a day to raise awareness of the gender gap in science and technology.

According to the United Nations, while yet women and girls continue to be excluded from participating fully in science, science and gender equality are vital to achieve the internationally agreed development goals, including the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Thus, in recent years, the international community has made a great effort to inspire and promote the participation of women and girls in science.

NANBIOSIS wants to acknowledge  the efforts made by scientific women who struggle every day to contribute their bit to Science and highlight their essential role in nowadays research. Especially we want to recognize the work of scientists women involved in our units, whatever is the nature of their contribution: technical, scientific development, management, coordination, direction, etc; just to mention some examples:
Neus Ferrer in the Scientific Direction of Unit 1 Protein Production Platform (PPP)
Pilar Marco and Nuria Pascual in the Management and Scientific Coordination of U2 Custom Antibody Service (CAbS) 
Miriam Royo in the Scientific Direction of U3 Synthesis of Peptides Unit
Laura Lechuga and M.Carmen Estevez in the Direction and Scientific Coordination of U4 Biodeposition and Biodetection Unit
Nora Ventosa and Nathaly Segovia in the Scientific Direction and Technical Coordination of U6 Biomaterial Processing and Nanostructuring Unit
Isabel Oliveira and Teresa Galán in the Coordination of U7 Nanotecnology Unit
Rosa Villa and Gemma Gabriel in the Management and Scientific Coordination of U8 Micro – Nano Technology Unit
Gema Martínez in the Scientific Coordination of U9 Synthesis of Nanoparticles Unit
Fany Peña in the Scientific Coordination of U13 Tissue & Scaffold Characterization Unit
Mª Luisa González Martín in the of Direction and Scientific Coordination of U16 Tissue & Scaffold Characterization Unit
Gemma Pascual and Isabel Trabado in the Coordination of the U17 Confocal Microscopy Service
Mª Virtudes Céspedes in the Scientific Coordination of U18 Nanotoxicology Unit
Beatriz Moreno in the Scientific Direction of Unit 19 Clinical tests lab
Ibane Abásolo in the Scientific Coordination of Unit 20 In Vivo Experimental Platformt
Verónica Crisóstomo in the Scientific Direction of Unit 24 Medical Imaging 

Ana Paula Candiota in the Scientific Coordination of Unit 25 Biomedical Applications I 
Maria Luisa García in the Scientific Direction of U28 NanoImaging Unit from Bionand, recently incorporated to NANBIOSIS

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Label-free bacteria quantification in blood plasma by a bioprinted microarray based interferometric point-of-care device

Prof Laura Lechuga, Scientific Director of NANBIOSIS U4 Biodeposition and Biodetection Unit is coauthor of an article publish by ACS Sonsors that shows a portable and autonomous device based on optical interferometry that, when used with specialized nanoplasmonic, can detect directly bacterial cells of the patient’s blood plasma.

The work demonstrates the potential of a microarray based POC device for bacteria quantification. The contribution of NANBIOSIS, in particular Unit 4, has been fundamental by providing the  molecular printers necessary for the generation of the biofunctionalized specific microarrayed chips used for the bacteria detection.

P. Dey, N. Fabri-Faja, O. Calvo-Lozano, R. Terborg, A. Belushkin, F. Yesilköy, A. Fàbrega, J. C. Ruiz-Rodriguez, R. Ferrer, J. J. González-López, M. C. Estévez, H. Altug, V. Pruneri, L. M. Lechuga. Label-free bacteria quantification in blood plasma by a bioprinted microarray based interferometric point-of-care device. ACS Sens., 20194 (1), pp 52–60 DOI: 10.1021/acssensors.8b00789

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PICCOLO PROJECT FACE-TO-FACE MEETING

The 5th project face to face meeting has taken place in Cáceres (Spain). The first version of the PICCOLO prototype was set up at CCMIJU, facilities at the end of 2018, and it has been a great chance to show it to the PICCOLO consortium members. During these two days of the meeting, the technical partners presented both the individual components of the prototype (MPT and OCT) and the integration of the same in the probe of the multi-photonic system. The attendants have been able to check in-situ the performance of the prototype in the operating rooms of CCMIJU. Based on this, and in close collaboration with clinical partners, next steps regarding the pre-clinical tests on animal models to be performed were discussed.

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation Programmeunder Grant Agreement No. 732111

Image of the meeting participants at the face to face meeting in the JUMISC, partner of NANBIOSIS.

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U28-E19. Beckman Coulter MoFlo cell sorter

Specifications:
Validated for 70,000 sorts per second with > 99% purity at all data rates
Proven 4-Way Sort for multiple population sorting
Independent control of each stream via touch screen control panel
High power solid state 488nm and 638nm lasers

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U28-E18. Beckman Coulter Galios flow cytometer

U28-E18. Beckman Coulter Galios flow cytometer

Specifications:
Solid State Diode Lasers: Blue 488nm (22mW), Red 638nm (25mW), Violet 405 (40mW)
10 independent fluorescence channels with easily interchangeable optical filters
Suitable for common fluorescence markers including: FITC, PE, ECD, PC5, PC5.5, PE-Cy7
125μm spatially separated beam spots
Gel coupled 1.2 NA optical collection lens
Forward scatter detector with adjustable collection angle for sub-micron, small and large particles sizes
Side scatter detector with independently focused high performance photodiode and electronic attenuation
Five different signals available from each detector: Integral linear and loga-rithmic, Peak linear and logarithmic and True Time of Flight linear Time, Ratio
User selectable flow rates (Low, Medium and High)
24-tube multi-loader carousel with integrated vortexer
Permits analysis of up to 88 tubes an hour at 10,000 events per second

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U28-E17. Perkin Elmer Operetta HCS confocal

U28-E17. Perkin Elmer Operetta HCS confocal

Specifications:
Spinning disc confocal technology
10x, 20x and 40x long working distance objectives
20x high NA objectives
Temperature control and CO2 for cultured cells
à 400W Xenon based illumination
Fully automated image acquisition from 24,96 and 384 well plates
Harmony: integrated acquisition and analysis software
Phenologic – machine learning-based phenotype recognition software
Columbus Image Data Storage and Analysis System

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