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News U17

News U17

Uraemic toxins impair skeletal muscle regeneration by inhibiting myoblast proliferation, reducing myogenic differentiation, and promoting muscular fibrosis

Elena Alcalde‑Estévez, Patricia Sosa, Ana Asenjo‑Bueno, Patricia Plaza, Gemma Olmos, Manuel Naves‑Díaz, Diego Rodríguez‑Puyol, Susana López‑Ongil & María P. Ruiz‑Torres, are the authors of an article recently published in the Journal Scientific Reports, of Nature Research, ·mentioning the collaboration in the investigation of the ICTS “NANBIOSIS” U17 Confocal Microscopy Service of CIBER-BNN and the University of Alcalá.

Uremic toxins (UT) increase in the serum in parallel with a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate and the development of sarcopenia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

This study analyses the role of UTs in sarcopenia associated with CKD in different stages of the disease.

Immunofluorescence and senescence assays were visualised using a Leica SP5 confocal microscope (Leica Microsystems, Wetzlar, Germany), through the Unit 17 Confocal Microscopy Service of the ICTS ‘NANBIOSIS’)

Through confocal microscopy studies in C2C12 cells (myoblasts), the role of high concentrations of UT in different mechanisms involved in the biology of skeletal muscle cells was observed. It was observed that they did not induce senescence (associated with beta-galactatosidase activity), but they did decrease the proliferative capacity of myoblasts, preventing the cells from entering the mitosis phase in a step prior to the condensation of chromosomes. Also, through confocal microscopy studies, it was determined that low concentrations of UT hindered myogenic differentiation of myoblasts in culture and promoted the expression of fibrosis markers” – explains Isabel Trabado, Technical Coordinator of NANBIOSIS U17

Article of reference: Alcalde-Estévez, E., Sosa, P., Asenjo-Bueno, A. et al. Uraemic toxins impair skeletal muscle regeneration by inhibiting myoblast proliferation, reducing myogenic differentiation, and promoting muscular fibrosis. Sci Rep 11512 (2021). [DOI] 

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Toxicity evaluation on non-target organisms with the collaboration of NANBIOSIS U17 Confocal microscopy

Sara Jiménez-Jiménez, Georgiana Amariei, Karina Boltes, María Ángeles García and María Luisa Marina have recently published an article in the Journal of Chromatography A, ·mentioning the collaboration in the investigation of the ICTS “NANBIOSIS” U17 Confocal Microscopy Service of CIBER-BNN and the University of Alcalá.

The echocytotoxicity of racemic panthenol and dexpanthenol at different concentrations and exposure times in Spirodela polyrhiza has been studied using NANBIOSIS U17 Confocal Microscopy Service

“Panthenol (racemic mixture) and its isomer dexpanthenol have been classified as toxic for the aquatic environment by the European Regulation (EC 1272/2008). These studies are based on the natural emission (autofluorescence) of chlorophyll in different parts of the aquatic plant Spirodela polyrhiza (root, shoot and leaf). The estimation of the IC50 for each one of the compounds concludes different behavior of the compounds in the different parts of the plant, showing a higher toxicity for the racemic mixture panthenol”, explains Isabel Trabado, Technical Coordinator of NANBIOSIS U17

Article of reference:

Sara Jiménez-Jiménez, Georgiana Amariei, Karina Boltes, María Ángeles García and María Luisa Marina. Enantiomeric separation of panthenol by Capillary Electrophoresis. Analysis of commercial formulations and toxicity evaluation on non-target organisms. Journal of Chromatography A 1639 (2021) 461919. [DOI]

Financial support:

Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (research project PID2019-104913GB-I00). Dirección General de Universidades e Investigación de la Comunidad de Madrid (Spain), REMTAVARES (project S2018/EMT-4341). University of Alcalá for research projects CCG19/CC-068 and CCG19/IA-050, and for G.A.’s post-doctoral contract. Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities for S.J.J.’s FPU pre-doctoral contract.

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NANBIOSIS Scientific Women in the International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Today February 11 is the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, a day to raise awareness of the gender gap in science and technology.

According to the United Nations, while yet women and girls continue to be excluded from participating fully in science, science and gender equality are vital to achieve the internationally agreed development goals, including the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Thus, in recent years, the international community has made a great effort to inspire and promote the participation of women and girls in science.

NANBIOSIS wants to acknowledge  the efforts made by scientific women who struggle every day to contribute their bit to Science and highlight their essential role in nowadays research. Especially we want to recognize the work of scientists women involved in NANBIOSIS, whatever is the nature of their contribution: technical, scientific development, management, coordination, direction, etc; just to mention some examples:
Neus Ferrer and Mercedes Márquez in the Scientific Direction and Coordination of Unit 1 Protein Production Platform (PPP)
Pilar Marco and Nuria Pascual in the Management and Scientific Coordination of U2 Custom Antibody Service (CAbS) 
Miriam Royo in the Scientific Direction of U3 Synthesis of Peptides Unit
Nora Ventosa and Nathaly Segovia in the Scientific Direction and Technical Coordination of U6 Biomaterial Processing and Nanostructuring Unit
Isabel Oliveira and Teresa Galán in the Coordination of U7 Nanotecnology Unit
Rosa Villa and Gemma Gabriel in the Management and Scientific Coordination of U8 Micro – Nano Technology Unit
Gema Martínez in the Scientific Coordination of U9 Synthesis of Nanoparticles Unit
Fany Peña in the Scientific Coordination of U13 Tissue & Scaffold Characterization Unit
Mª Luisa González Martín and Margarita Hierro in the of Direction and Scientific Coordination of U16 Tissue & Scaffold Characterization Unit
Gemma Pascual and Isabel Trabado in the Coordination of the U17 Confocal Microscopy Service
Isolda Casanova in the Scientific Coordination of U18 Nanotoxicology Unit
Beatriz Moreno in the Scientific Direction of Unit 19 Clinical tests lab
Ibane Abásolo in the Scientific Coordination of Unit 20 In Vivo Experimental Platformt
Verónica Crisóstomo in the Scientific Direction of Unit 24 Medical Imaging 
Ana Paula Candiota in the Scientific Coordination of Unit 25 Biomedical Applications I 
Maria Luisa García in the Scientific Direction of U28 NanoImaging Unit from Bionand, recently incorporated to NANBIOSIS, Anna Aviñó in the Scientific Coordination of U29 Oligonucleotide Synthesis Platform (OSP) – and

Nerea Argarate in the coordination of NANBIOSIS

Thanks to all of you and your teams!

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Cardiac hypertrophy research with NANBIOSIS unit 17 Confocal Microscopy Service participation

A new article has been recently published about Cardiac hypertrophy research in the Scientific Reports Jorunal by NatureResarch, counting with the expertise of NANBIOSIS unit 17 Confocal Microscopy Service form CIBER-BBN and University of Alcalá de Henares.

Cardiac hypertrophy is the abnormal enlargement, or thickening, of the heart muscle, resulting from increases in cardiomyocyte size and changes in other heart muscle components, such as extracellular matrix. This article relates more especifically with the link between long term exposure to xenoestrogen Bisphenol-A and adverse cardiovascular effects and the role of necroptosis in cardiac response to BPA had not yet been explored.

NANBIOSIS U17, Confocal microscopy Unit is mentioned in the Materials and Methods section: Slides containing tissue sections were incubated with the primary antibodies overnight 4 °C. After washing with PBS, the slides were incubated with FITC, Alexa-488, or Alexa-647-conjugated secondary antibodies for 1 hour at room temperature. Nuclei were stained with Hoechst. Images were taken for data quantification using a Leica TCS SP5 confocal microscope (UAH-NANBIOSIS-CIBER-BNN). At least five different fields per condition were obtained.

In the picture, F) Representative confocal images from heart sections of CT and 8 weeks treated BPA mice after injection with Evans blue (red fluorescence) followed by immunostaining for α-SMA (green). Nuclei were labeled with Hoechst in blue (n = 4 mice per condition). (a and b) CT hearts sections obtained at different magnifications showed no signs of EB extravasation. (c) and (d) are different sections of coronary arteries of BPA hearts with extravasation areas. Scale bar = 25 μm (a and c) and 50μm (b and d). IL = intraluminal area and (*) marks areas of EB extravasation.

Article of refrence:

Reventun, P., Sanchez-Esteban, S., Cook, A. et al. Bisphenol A induces coronary endothelial cell necroptosis by activating RIP3/CamKII dependent pathway. Sci Rep 10, 4190 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-61014-1

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Optimization of Recycled-Membrane Biofilm Reactor as a sustainable biological treatment for microcystins removal with nanbiosis expertise.

Jesús Morón-López (IMDEA), Serena Molina (Chemical Engineering Department, University of Alcalá) have recently published the results of their research about Recycled-Membrane Biofilm Reactor as a sustainable biological treatment for microcystins (MC) removal. The study addresses the lack of sustainable technologies for water treatment, while opening an alternative in sustainable solid waste management under a circular economy approach.

The biofilm visualization has been performed by ICTS “NANBIOSIS”, more specifically by the Unit 17 Confocal Microscopy Service of Ciber in Bioengineering, Biomaterials & Nanomedicine (CIBER-BNN) at the Alcala University (CAI Medicine Biology) led by Juan Manuel Bellón y Gemma Pascual. In this case, the biofilm attached to the recycled membrane was observed under the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM Leica SP5, Leica Microsystems) of NANBIOSIS Unit 17.

Article of refrence:

Jesús Morón-López, Serena Molina, Optimization of Recycled-Membrane Biofilm Reactor (R-MBfR) as a sustainable biological treatment for microcystins removal Biochemical Engineering Journal 153 (2020) 107422

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Hydrogels structured with dual stimuli responsive for biomedical applications

Researchers of NANBIOSIS Unit 17 Confocal Microscopy Service have participated in the research carried out structuring hydrophobic domains in Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-Methacrylic acid) hydrogels for biomedical aplplications.

Hydrogels are cross-linked polymeric networks, which have the ability to hold a large amount of water in their structure. Hydrogels can be designed to respond to a specific stimulus such as temperature, pH, ionic strength, light, etc., making making them suitable for biomedical applications, as drug delivery.

The most popular responsive polymeric hydrogel is made of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM). The copolymerization of NIPAM with an acrylic/methacrylic acid monomer permits the development of a hydrogel with a dual stimuli response: temperature and medium pH. Additionally, the acid groups can electrostatically interact with positively charged drugs, the interaction being sensitive to pH. Therefore, these hydrogel systems have great potential for drug delivery applications.

At it seemed that the structuring of dual stimuli responsive hydrogels had not been reported, the authors deat with the structuring of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) hydrogels to create hydrophobic domains by means of copolymerization of NIPAM with methacrylic acid and a small percentage of a nitrocatechol monomer in an aqueous medium that contained SDS. This structured hydrogel allows is capable of loading hydrophobic molecules as well as charged drugs. The hydrogel permitted cell adhesion and growth as well as its detachment when the temperature fell below the LCST.

As reported in the article, fluorescence images of cells were obtained with a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) (Leica TCS-SP5) through the Confocal Microscopy Service of ICTS ‘NANBIOSIS’ U17 of the Biomedical Research Networking Centre on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN at the University of Alcalá, Madrid, Spain).
equipped with a Diode 405 nm and a continuous Ar ion laser (488, 514,
561 and 633 nm).

Article of refrence:

Structuring hydrophobic domains in Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-
Methacrylic acid) hydrogels. Mar López-González, M. Melia Rodrigo, Mercedes Valiente, Isabel Trabado, Francisco Mendicutib, Gema Marcelo. European Polymer Journal. April 2020 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpolymj.2020.109695

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Mechanism and Consequences of the Impaired Hif-1α Response to Hypoxia in Human Proximal Tubular HK-2 Cells Exposed to High Glucose

NANBIOSIS has been informed about a recent publication in the pretigious scientific magzine SCIENTIFIC REPORTS (Q1) of Nature Research group, mentioning NANBIOSIS Unit 17 in the Methods section:

Immunofluorescence analysis: Detection was performed by using a Leica SP5 confocal microscope (Leica Microsystems, Wetzlar, Germany), through the Confocal Microscopy Service of the ICTS ‘NANBIOSIS’ Unit 17 of the Biomedical Research Networking Centre on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN) at the University of Alcalá, Madrid, Spain. HIF-1α-dependent immunofluorescence intensity was quantified after digital capture using image-J software.

The Leica TCS-SP5 confocal microscope with especial features allows studying interactions between cells/tissues and materials. Indeed, the experience of the research group in charge of this service makes it a unique service for the study of cells and tissues and the interactions between various materials and cell components as well as between implants/scaffolds and tissues of the recipient organism

Article of reference:

Mechanism and Consequences of the Impaired Hif-1α Response to Hypoxia in Human Proximal Tubular HK-2 Cells Exposed to High Glucose. Coral García-Pastor, Selma Benito-Martínez, Victoria Moreno-Manzano, Ana B. Fernández-Martínez, Francisco Javier Lucio-Cazaña. SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, (2019) 9:15868 | https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-52310-6

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Best Poster award at the congress of Spanish Society of Nephrology

Researchers of Unit 17 of NANBIOSIS Confocal Microscopy Service and the GITBIT-UAH group (CIBER-BBN, Univerty of Alcalá de Henares), have been awarded with the PRIZE FOR THE BEST POSTER COMMUNICATION by the Spanish Society of Nephrology (S.E.N.) and Senefro Foundation.

“The ILK deletion prevents extravasation of monocytic line leukocytes induced by the accumulation of uremic toxins during chronic kidney disease” authored by CAMPILLO DE BLAS, L BOHORQUEZ MAGRO, D GARCÍA AYUSO, B GARCÍA CARRASCO, M GRIERA, S DE FRUTOS, M RODRÍGUEZ-PUYOL, D RODRÍGUEZ-PUYOL, L CALLEROS BASILIO.

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New Antimicrobial surfaces with self-cleaning properties and NANBIOSIS Unit 17

In the last decades, increased resistance to conventional antibiotics has led to important research in the development of alternative strategies for preventing pathogen dissemination. Antimicrobial surfaces containing a biocidal agent inhibit or reduce microorganisms growth capacity on the surface of materials. In addition to this microbial proliferation inhibition, antimicrobial coatings may also confer additional properties.

Researchers from the University of Alcalá and the CSIC Institute of Catalysis and Petrochemistry, have carried out a research about the self-cleaning properties of antimicrobial surfaces functionalized by photocatalytic ZnO electrosprayed coatings.

The authors prepared electrosprayed photoactive coatings of sol-gel ZnO nanoparticles tested as dual action self-cleaning antimicrobial surfaces. The materials showed excellent photocatalytic and photodisinfection properties due to the release of bioavailable zinc and photogenerated oxidative species. The surfaces were free from bacterial colonization and biofilm formation.

Confocal microscopy of NANBIOSIS U17 was used to reveal biofilm matrix using FilmTracer SYPRO Ruby stain and to assess cell viability by means of Live/Dead BacLight Bacterial Viability Kit.

Article of reference:

Laura Valenzuela, Ana Iglesias, Marisol Faraldos, Ana Bahamonde, Roberto Rosal, Antimicrobial surfaces with self-cleaning properties functionalized by photocatalytic ZnO electrosprayed coatings, Journal of Hazardous Materials, Volume 369, 2019, Pages 665-673, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2019.02.073.

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NANBIOSIS Scientific Women in the International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Today February 11 is the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, a day to raise awareness of the gender gap in science and technology.

According to the United Nations, while yet women and girls continue to be excluded from participating fully in science, science and gender equality are vital to achieve the internationally agreed development goals, including the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Thus, in recent years, the international community has made a great effort to inspire and promote the participation of women and girls in science.

NANBIOSIS wants to acknowledge  the efforts made by scientific women who struggle every day to contribute their bit to Science and highlight their essential role in nowadays research. Especially we want to recognize the work of scientists women involved in our units, whatever is the nature of their contribution: technical, scientific development, management, coordination, direction, etc; just to mention some examples:
Neus Ferrer in the Scientific Direction of Unit 1 Protein Production Platform (PPP)
Pilar Marco and Nuria Pascual in the Management and Scientific Coordination of U2 Custom Antibody Service (CAbS) 
Miriam Royo in the Scientific Direction of U3 Synthesis of Peptides Unit
Laura Lechuga and M.Carmen Estevez in the Direction and Scientific Coordination of U4 Biodeposition and Biodetection Unit
Nora Ventosa and Nathaly Segovia in the Scientific Direction and Technical Coordination of U6 Biomaterial Processing and Nanostructuring Unit
Isabel Oliveira and Teresa Galán in the Coordination of U7 Nanotecnology Unit
Rosa Villa and Gemma Gabriel in the Management and Scientific Coordination of U8 Micro – Nano Technology Unit
Gema Martínez in the Scientific Coordination of U9 Synthesis of Nanoparticles Unit
Fany Peña in the Scientific Coordination of U13 Tissue & Scaffold Characterization Unit
Mª Luisa González Martín in the of Direction and Scientific Coordination of U16 Tissue & Scaffold Characterization Unit
Gemma Pascual and Isabel Trabado in the Coordination of the U17 Confocal Microscopy Service
Mª Virtudes Céspedes in the Scientific Coordination of U18 Nanotoxicology Unit
Beatriz Moreno in the Scientific Direction of Unit 19 Clinical tests lab
Ibane Abásolo in the Scientific Coordination of Unit 20 In Vivo Experimental Platformt
Verónica Crisóstomo in the Scientific Direction of Unit 24 Medical Imaging 
Ana Paula Candiota in the Scientific Coordination of Unit 25 Biomedical Applications I 
Maria Luisa García in the Scientific Direction of U28 NanoImaging Unit from Bionand, recently incorporated to NANBIOSIS

Thanks to all of you and your teams!

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