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Posts Taged nanomedicine

The Medicine of the Future needs the Nanomedicine Revolution. This is why

The medicine of the future is an increasingly tackled topic. In the context of global concern for the sustainability of the health system (chronic diseases, new disorders, aging population and financing problems), nanomedicine could promote more affordable and personalized health care and improve the quality of life of the patients.

Between innovative techniques already implemented and concepts that evoke science fiction (nanobots, fluorescent particles working as spies, tiny Trojan horses introduced into our body …), nanomedicine generates great expectations.

Nanomedicine, what is it exactly?

Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to medicine, that is, the use of nanotechnologic systems for the prevention, diagnosis or treatment of diseases, due to the particular properties that materials present on a nanometric scale. (Yes, although it seems strange, the same material has totally different attributes and behaviours when “nano” amounts of it are manipulated, what is very important in medicine, since many of the processes of the human body take place on a nanometric scale).

The current state, thanks to the previous effort.

When in 1959 Richard Feynmand, (Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965), gave his speech “There is a lot of space down there”, he opened the door to research at the nano scale: from 1nm to 100nm, this is one-millionth of a millimeter (10-9 meters); we are talking about the range of sizes resulting from dividing the diameter of a hair between 1,000 and 10,000, (or what a nail grows in a second).

Since the entry into the market of the first nanomedicine in 1995 (Doxil®, a drug encapsulated in liposomes for the treatment of cancer), nanoparticles or nanostructures have been developed for the controlled release of drugs in cancer and other pathologies, nanodevices have been created for disease diagnosis or nanomaterials have been designed for applications in regenerative medicine, and even messenger RNA vaccines for Covid-19, such as those from Pfizer and Moderna, are nanoformulated. Today there are on the market a hundred nanoformulated drugs all thanks to previous research and development of nanomaterials and nanoparticles over the last three decades.

The “Observatory of Trends in Medicine of the Future” promoted by the Roche Institute foundation has recently published a Report on Nanomedicine coordinated by Dr. Ramón Martínez Máñez, Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at the UPV and Scientific Director of the Centre for Networked Biomedical Research in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN) in which Dr. José Becerra, Professor of Cell Biology at the University of Malaga and Principal Researcher at CIBER-BBN, BIONAND and IBIMA, Dr. Pilar Marco, Principal Investigator of the Nanobiotechnology group for the diagnosis (Nb4D) of the IQAC-CSIC and Coordinator of the Nanomedicine Research Program of the CIBER-BBN and Dr. María Jesús Vicent, Chief Researcher of the Therapeutic Polymers Laboratory and coordinator of the Advanced Therapies Area of ​​the Príncipe Felipe Research Center have participated as experts. The report was presented at the IV Conference “Anticipating the Medicine of the Future” on November 30, 2021 where a debate was held by the above mentioned in which various topics related to nanomedicine were discussed, such as its applications and barriers.

Nanomedicine applications of today and tomorrow

Nanomedicine is completely transversal, multidisciplinary and dependent on other disciplines, so its applications are multiple and complementary to other branches of knowledge such as artificial intelligence, but the following fields stand out fundamentally.

The design of nanomaterials that improve biocompatibility or biomechanical properties is investigated and can be used for the manufacture of implants that allow replacing portions of diseased tissue and that can even be designed in a personalized way attending to the individual response of each patient, minimizing the risk of rejection by the patient in regenerative medicine.

Nanoparticles are used to build highly sensitive nanodiagnostic platforms, which provide comprehensive biological information easily, quickly and economically at an increasingly early stage. Pilar Marco visualizes a future where “the diagnosis could be our molecular fingerprint, so that the detection of changes in said fingerprint could lead to the detection of a disease before the patient presents symptoms. In turn, this will contribute to prediction and prognosis since, if a large amount of information is available, it can be crossed with genetic information”.

Nanomedicine makes it possible to improve the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of current drugs, so that they specifically deploy their activity in diseased cells and tissues in a controlled way over time and crossing any biological barrier, which is called controlled drug release. According to Ramón Martínez “Any disease can be susceptible to use these systems to deliver a drug in the appropriate organ or tissue with the reduction of drug doses and side effects.”

Finally, nanotechnology methods facilitate the fusion of diagnosis and therapy in the new medical field of theragnostic; diagnose and treat at the same time by understanding the biological response to treatments, that is, the administration of drugs whose molecules allow visualize how the drug is working.

Barriers faced by nanomedicine

In addition to the difficulties presented by nanomedicine in matters of regulation and industrial property, the aforementioned experts agree that one of the most important challenges is the standardization of manufacturing procedures and quality controls, investment is needed in infrastructures to fine-tune manufacturing and standardization systems (manufacturing of nanoparticles under GMP) and in collaboration with the private sector, which is crucial, to make nanomedicine reach the productive sector and society.

But there are also barriers in the research itself, and funding is needed to break them down. In nanomedicine research, cost / effectiveness analyses have to be focused on the long term. Professor José Becerra explains it very clearly: “Research topics become fashionable and it happens frequently that the years go by and administrations “get tired” of financing a certain field and this is a problem because if a tree is planted by a person who knows It takes ten years to bear fruit, this person has to take care of the tree, but if we give the tree care to someone who does not know about trees, probably this person will abandon the tree in five years … Scientific policies have to persevere in financing nano and accompany it with an improvement in the regulation of products and only then will companies invest in this area”.

At the end of the debate, Professor José Becerra celebrated that the Carlos III Health Institute opted, fifteen years ago, for the creation of a CIBER in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, as a tool for scientific policy, he also mentioned the NANBIOSIS platform created by CIBER-BBN, CCMIJU and BIONAND, recognized as ICTS by the Ministry and available for companies and researchers to produce and characterize bio and nanomaterials, and stated that “it is evident that it is not possible to advance in the transfer of knowledgy from nano to the clinic at the same rate as is done in other knowledge areas but to take care of this project is essential”.

Related news:

Nanomedicine in the Medicine of the future

The Nanomedicine Revolution

informe sobre nanomedicina

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A more effective nanomedicine has been developed for the treatment of Fabry rare disease

Nanomedicine: how to get drugs to the place where they have to act.

A new generation of devices for the rapid, cheap and easy diagnosis of candidemia

New Nanomedicines for the topical treatment of complex wounds

Sources of information:

Nanomedicine (European Nanotecnology Platform)

IV Jornada Anticipando la Medicina del Fututo

Nanomedicine Report

Nanomed Spain

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Nanomedicine in the Medicine of the Future

Scientists of CIBER-BBN and NANBIOSIS ICTS have participated in the 4th Conference “Anticipating the Medicine of the Future”, which took place on November 30th, organized by the Roche Institute Foundation. The topics for this ediction had been identified by the Observatory of Trends in the Medicine of the Future: Pharmacogenomics, Nanomedicine and Epigenomic

The event counted with three roundtables for discussion in relation to the three topics. The second one, on Nanomedicine, was moderated by Joaquín Arenas, Director of the Research Institute of the 12 de Octubre University Hospital.

Ramón Martínez Máñez, Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at the Interuniversity Research Institute for Molecular Recognition and Technological Development (IDM) of the Polytechnic University of Valencia and Scientific Director of CIBER-BBN and Unit 26 of NANBIOSIS gave a talk entitled “Macro problems, nano solutions”. After that, the debate was openwith the participation of Maria Pilar Marco, Research Professor of the Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC) and Coordinator of the Nanomedicine Research Program CIBER-BBN and Scientific Director of unit 2 of NANBIOSIS, CAbS, José Becerra, Emeritus Professor of of Cell Biology of the University of Malaga and Principal Investigator of CIBER-BBN, BIONAND and IBIMA and Maria Jesús Vicent, Coordinator of the Advanced Therapies Area of the Principe Felipe Research Center.

The Roundtable discussed the applications of nanomedicine in the Medicine of the Future and in Personalized Precision Medicine, as well as the challenges facing nanomedicine.

The Observatory of Trends in the Medicine of the Future, promoted by the Roche Institute Foundation, aims to generate and disseminate knowledge in areas of incipient knowledge related to Personalized Precision Medicine and that are part of the Medicine of the Future.

In this context, the fundation Instituto Roche has recently published a report on nanomedicine coordinated by Ramón Martínez in which José Becerra, María Pilar Marco and María Jesús Vicent have participated as experts.

Currently, nanoparticles or nanostructures are being applied for the controlled release of drugs in cancer and other pathologies and nanodevices for the diagnosis of diseases or the development of nanomaterials for applications in regenerative medicine. In the coming years, and with the translation into clinical practice of more and more developments based on these technologies, nanomedicine will contribute to the medicine of the future approaching the diagnosis and treatment of diseases earlier, more efficiently and in a more efficient and personalized way.

https://www.institutoroche.es/observatorio/nanomedicina

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New NANBIOSIS’ focus on Cutting-Edge Biomedical Solutions

We are delighted to announce the publication of our new corporate brochure which reflects NANBIOSIS’s main core competences. This fresh looking promotion material has been intentionally designed to emphasize our experience of join expertise and capabilities solving problems in biomedical research, focussing on quality, adaptability and excellence commitment.

The NANBIOSIS’ Cutting-Edge biomedical solutions  have been updated to offer a wider range of Integrated solutions to advanced challenges faced by biomedical researchers in the fields of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, diagnostic and medical devices.

The Cutting-Edge biomedical solutions offered by the ICTS NANBIOSIS have been organised drilling down on our key areas:

  • Customized biomolecules production & Validation
  • Customized nanomedicines production & Preclinical Validation
  • Customized biomaterials production & Preclinical Validation
  • Diagnostic Devices production & Validation

Downloadable PDF of the brochure is here available

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New Nanomedicines for the topical treatment of complex wounds

Acute and chronic wounds are a growing global health problem. The incidence of non-healing chronic wounds has exponentially increased with the aging of the population and chronic diseases. It has been estimated that there is a 2% prevalence of chronic wounds in the general population, which is associated with an annual estimated cost of more than US$50 billion. Biomaterial-based treatments are helpful in improving small-sized and uncomplicated ulcers. Biologic molecules, named epidermal growth factors (EGFs) have demonstrated potent therapeutic efficacy along with limited side effects, however, exogenous EGF is rapidly cleared from the topical application site.

Jaume Veciana, Nora Ventosa and co-workers have reported a soft, reliable, and scalable method based on compressed CO2 for obtaining nanoconjugates of recombinant human epidermal growth factors and nanovesicles. These nanoconjugates exhibit appropriate physicochemical properties together with an antimicrobial activity preventing infections that promote complete closure of complex wounds. Therefore, such nanoconjugates are a potential nanomedicine for the topical treatment of complex wounds, particularly diabetic foot ulcers. The article published by the medical journal Advances in Therapy was chosen to be the cover of number 6 in June.

The use of NANBIOSIS Unit 6 of Biomaterial Processing and Nanostructuring Unit (from CIBER-BBN and ICMAB-CSIC) has allowed the obtaining of various versions of the nanoconjugates as well as their physical-chemical characteristics” – explained prof. Jaume Veciana

Article of reference: Nanoconjugates: Lidia Ferrer-Tasies, Hector Santana, Ingrid Cabrera-Puig, Elisabet González-Mira, Lídia Ballell-Hosa, Carla Castellar-Álvarez, Alba Córdoba, Josep Merlo-Mas, Haydee Gerónimo, Glay Chinea, Viviana Falcón, Evelyn Moreno-Calvo, Jan Skov Pedersen, Jessica Romero, Claudia Navarro-Requena, Calixto Valdés, Miladys Limonta, Jorge Berlanga, Santiago Sala, Eduardo Martínez, Jaume Veciana and Nora Ventosa, Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor/Quatsome Nanoconjugates: A Robust Topical Delivery System for Complex Wound HealingAdv. Therap. 2021 14 June, 2000260 [DOI]

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The importance of Nanomedicine and Bioengineering to address health challenges

Josep Samitier, Coordinator of the Nanomedicine Platform (NanoMed) and Director of IBEC, as well as Scientific Director of NANBIOSIS unit 7 of Nanotecnology, of IBEC and CIBER-BBN, particiated in the XIV Annual Conference of Biomedical Research Technology Platforms was held on 11 and 12 May.

The Conference counted with the presence of relevant public and private sector actors, and more than 700 registered participants. During the opening ceremony, was opened, among others, by the Minister of Science and Innovation, Pedro Duque, it was precisely emphasized the importance of investment in science and technology. In the words of Josep Samitier: “The health area is experiencing a paradigm shift towards predictive, preventive, personalized, participatory, precision medicine and integrated healthcare. This change cannot be achieved without the different medical technologies, with special importance of nanomedicine, which will offer new opportunities to face the challenge by increasing the efficiency of health systems, while reducing costs ”. Samitier also reminded that two of the vaccines currently administered in Spain are based on nanotechnology. 

Source of information: IBEC

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The Nanomedicine Revolution

Yesterday, November, 25 took place, within the the program of the Ateneo of the EINA (School of Engineering and Architecture of Aragón), the online conference on “The Revolution of Nanomedicine” by Ramón Martínez Máñez.

The Conference chair, Jesús Martínez de la Fuente, Principal Investigator of the BIONANOSURF group of CIBER-BBN and the Institute of Nanoscience and Materials of Aragón, introduced the guest, Ramón Martínez Máñez, Scientific Director of CIBER-BBN, highlighting “his creativity in the use of his systems and how he combines them with different diagnostic release systems, combining organic chemistry, surface chemistry, applications in biotechnology and giving way to translation and transfer, his works are very unique

Ramón Martínez Máñez, Scientific Director NANBIOSIS unit 26 NMR: Biomedical Applications II, gave a very instructive talke about what is nanotechnology and how nanotechnology revolution has reached the medicine, with current examples of the application of nanomedicines, as well as in the medicine of the future.

After it, a very interesting debate took place in which different issues were discussed, especially in relation to nanomedicine applied to therapy, such as the barriers to generalize the use of nanoparticles in therapy, the current state of implantation of nanoformulated drugs in the market and the advancement of the use of some nanoparticles as polymers or liposomes compared to inorganic nanoparticles, the degree of development of nanoparticles under GLP certification or why cancer is the main target of nanomedicine with a great difference over other pathologies. The audience asked questions that led to the discussion of some more controversial points such as whether it is true that “Big Pharma” does not like nanoparticles, why there is a regulatory vacuum regarding their use and how to solve these problems.

Regarding the diagnosis applications, Ramón Martínez commented that “nanotechnology already has its way open, both in the development of nanoparticles and systems to amplify the signal, based on nanophotonics, resonant rings or other technologies at the nanometric level. The pandemic has highlighted the importance of having rapid detection systems for bio parameters, pathogens, bacteria … We have a lot of knowledge acquired in recent years in these systems and they are currently being developed in a more or less short time, we are truly close to revolutionizing the field of detection“.

Finally, in realtion with the nanomedicine of the future, the questions raised in the debate revolved mainly around nanobots and their state of development or the problems that are emerging in it or the possibility of uniting nanomedicine with artificial intelligence and possible applications.

The Ateneo is an activity of the EINA in collaboration with the Aragón Engineering Research Institute and SAMCA Chair of Technological Development of Aragon, both directed by Pablo Laguna, Scientific Director of Nanbiosis U27 High Performance Computing. Pablo Laguna closed the event thanking Ramón Martínez Máñez and Jesús Martínez de la Fuente for their participation and highlighting the high number of attendees at the conference.

The conference can be followed in Spanish in EINA youtoube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_Fh1O1VuNU

Anouncing this Conference in the Ateneo EINA, Ramón Martínez Máñez was yesterday interviewed by Aragon Radio. In this case, the interview had the focuss in the “Nanomedicine against COVID” . The podcast can be listen in Spanish here: https://www.cartv.es/aragonradio/podcast/emision/nanomedicina-frente-a-la-covid

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CLINAM 2020: Clinical Nanomedicine and the Impact of Digitalization and Artificial Intelligence for Precision Medicine

CLINAM, the European Foundation for Clinical Nanomedicine will celebrate on October 26 – 28, 2020 the 12th European and Global Summit for Nanomedicine with the subject Clinical Nanomedicine and the Impact of Digitalization and Artificial Intelligence for Precision Medicine. The Technologies for Diagnosis & Therapy in Patient-Centric Medicine The Conference will take place in Live Stream, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

NANBIOSIS will participate in the Virtual Enhibition and in the poster session with a poster “Cutting Edge Biomedical Solutions in Health for Translation into Clinics”. Also Prof. Simó Schwartz, Scientific Director of NANBIOSIS U20 In vivo Experimental Platform, will give a talk about “Delivery of AntiCancer stem cell drugs in colorectal metastatic cancer” and Dr. Ibane Abasolo, Scientific Coordinator of the same Unit, will participate with a talk titled “Extracellular vesicles increase the efficacy of Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Lysosomal Storage Disorders”.

The Virtual Lounge will be available as from October 21, 2020.

Registration Link for CLINAM SUMMIT 12 / 2020 (click here)

The final program: Download)

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Nanomedicine: how to get drugs to the place where they have to act.

At the beginning of June, the Jury of the Rei Jaume I 2018 Awards, formed by Nobel Prize winners, businessmen and scientists, met in Valencia to choose the winners.

Today has taken place the ceremony of delivery of the 30th edition of the awards presided over by King Felipe VI. Among the six winners, in the category of New Technologies was Ramón Martínez Mañez, Scientific Director of the CIBER-BBN and Unit 26 of NANBIOSIS.

Coinciding with its thirtieth anniversary, the Rei Jaume Foundation has produced a series of videos of interviews with the winners. In this video, Ramón Martínez Mañez, Scientific Director of Unit 26 of NANBIOSIS, who has received the Rei Jaume I Award for New Technologies, talks about the two major areas in which he works and other topics such as the recognition of science and the need to recover the talent of researchers who go out of Spain and a better connection between research and the company. Some of his answers are the following:

One of our lines of research is in the field of sensors: systems based on nanotechnology for the detection of substances such as the presence of pathogens that may be harmful to health. The other major area is nanomedicines for the controlled release of drugs, one of the fundamental ideas of nanomedicine is how to get drugs to the place where they have to act.

Recognition in science is obtained if your works are cited, having social recognition is much more difficult.

We are a good country in science but we are a country in the second division in the transfer of science to the companies, it is needed more investment so that the products end up coming to the market or so that more research is done in collaboration with companies in Spain.

It is good to leave Spain, not necessarily to succeed but to see how they work in other places. The problem that exists today is that it is very difficult to return to Spain and this is a pity because there are very well educated and very good people who stay abroad.

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Ramón Martínez Máñez Master class on Nanomedicine at the Act of the Academic Opening year 2018-2019  of Spanish university

On September 25, the Polytechnic University of Valencia hosted the Solemn Act of the new Academic Opening year 2018-2019  of Spanish universities, coinciding with the commemoration of its 50th anniversary. This institutional act was chaired by S.M. King Felipe VI, the Minister of Science, Innovation and Universities, Pedro Duque, and the President of the Generalitat Valenciana, Ximo Puig, among many other authorities.

Ramón Martínez Máñez, has been in charge of teaching the master class of the new academic year. Ramón Martínez is professor of the Department of Chemistry of the UPV and director of the Interuniversity Research Institute of Molecular Recognition and Technological Development, besides Scientific Director of CIBER-BBN and Scientific Director of NANBIOSIS U26 NMR: Biomedical Applications II

In the master class, Martínez Máñez explained that nanomedicine aims to “identify diseases in their early stages at the cellular and molecular level through the use of nanodevices and contrast systems” in order to “provide an early diagnosis and, therefore, improve the prognosis of the disease“. Ramón Martínez Mañez, Rei Jaume I Award for New Technologies 2018 has underlined that, nanomedicine “is already a well-established area of ​​knowledge that seeks to apply the continuous advances of nanotechnology to medicine” and that “there are numerous studies that demonstrate its great capacity for the development of new diagnostic devices, new systems for the controlled release of drugs and materials suitable for the development of tissues.  In fact, as indicated “there are already in the market biomedical solutions based on nanotechnology such as nanoformulated drugs.” For the professor of the UPV, “we do not know what is the future of medicine, but without a doubt nanotechnology will play an important role in its development and, although we do not know who will carry out these advances, undoubtedly, the research developed in the university it will play a fundamental role “.

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NANBIOSIS presented at the 12th annual event of the ETPN

During the days 17-19 of October Malaga has hosted the 12th annual event of European Platform of Technology in Nanomedicine (ETPN), a European meeting of 200 experts in research and innovation in nanomedicine.

The meeting was organized by Bionand, the Spanish Platform of Nanomedicine (Nanomed Spain), the Institute of Nanoscience of Madrid (Imdea) and the Center for Biomedical Research Network in the area of ​​Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), partner of NANBIOSIS.

During the event, the ETPN General Assembly took place as well as parallel meetings of the specialized working groups on different scientific and cross-cutting aspects related to nanomedicine

In this framework, the ICTS NANBIOSIS has been presented by the Scientific Director of CIBER-BBN, Ramón Martínez Máñez, to the European Nanomedicine community.

EUROPEAN TECHNICAL PLATFORM OF NANOMEDICINE

The European Technology Platforms are a key element in the European field of innovation, associations born with the mission of sharing knowledge, mobilizing the actors involved and developing sector strategies, all based on the social challenges established by the European Commission and with the ultimate goal of its translation to the market.

The European Nanomedicine Technology Platform (ETPN) was created in 2005 by the European Commission and a group of experts from academia and industry who have since contributed to the publication of various strategic documents identifying the needs and the roadmaps for research in Nanomedicine in Europe. Its main objectives are to establish a clear strategic vision of the sector, to reduce the fragmentation of nanomedical research, to mobilize public and private investment, to identify priority areas, to promote innovation in nanobiotechnologies for medical use and to strengthen Europe’s competitiveness in this sector scientific and industrial level

Currently, the ETPN has more than 120 members from 25 countries, representing all actors involved in nanomedicine, such as academic institutions, research centers, small and medium enterprises, industry, public agencies, representatives of the platforms the European Commission itself, among others.

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